2024 Eurobike Finds (Part 2): Wild Cargo Bikes, Magnesium Pedals, Triple-Ratchet Hubs, and Much More…

After putting in some 70,000 steps around the vast expanse of Eurobike, Logan compiles a final massive roundup of the most exciting and interesting bikes and gear from the expo. Find over 30 highlights, including some remarkable cargo bikes, loads of stashable tools, two sweet steel mountain bikes, new grips, pedals, and forks, quick-release bags and cages, an expandable cargo rack, and more here…

It’s hard to describe the magnitude of Eurobike to folks who haven’t been. I’ve never seen anything quite like it. There are essentially four massive buildings in the Frankfurt Messe that make up seven giant exhibit halls, each of which takes hours to walk. I think I averaged about 20,000 steps per day wandering through thousands of brands and vendors. Most Eurobike media veterans recommend bringing three pairs of shoes to preserve your feet. I did not, and my feet were wrecked at the end of it. It was well worth it, however. I met a lot of amazing people over four days in Frankfurt, including folks who’ve contributed to the site, regular readers, and a lot of industry people who I’ve communicated with over the years. In addition, there were a ton of interesting products and clues to where the bike industry is headed, for better or worse.

For part two of our 2024 Eurobike roundup, I compiled a list of a couple dozen products, bikes, and things that I found interesting while roaming this behemoth of all things bike. There’s a lot here, so let’s jump right into it. And if you missed it, you can find part one linked here.

Huhn “Slope Chicken” Hardtail

After scanning my Eurobike press pass and walking into the event on day one last Wednesday, the first thing that caught my eye was the lovely Huhn hardtail hanging on the wall in Trickstuff’s booth. Huhn is a one-person brand based in Bischofsgrün, Germany, a small town in the southeast of the country near the Czechia border. I was somewhat familiar with Huhn since we featured one of their full-suspension builds in our 2022 Bespoked coverage, but this was the first time I’d seen one of their bikes in the flesh. All of them are incredibly clean looking and very polished; this one was no exception, and I had to get some photos of it.

Huhn Hardtail, Eurobike 2024 Part 2

Come to find out, this particular hardtail is the personal bike of Ralf Holleis, Huhn’s founder. The bike’s called the Hanghuhn, which is a hilariously good name. Huhn translates to chicken, a name Ralf provided some reasoning for giving to his bike brand in our Bespoked entry. Similarly, Hanghuhn is the German name for a fantasy creature that’s mainly used in jokes—a kind of chicken that, due to their habitat mainly being steeply sloping terrain, have evolved legs of different lengths through evolutionary adaptation in order to be able to stand better on the slope.

  • Huhn Hardtail, Eurobike 2024 Part 2
  • Huhn Hardtail, Eurobike 2024 Part 2
  • Huhn Hardtail, Eurobike 2024 Part 2
  • Huhn Hardtail, Eurobike 2024 Part 2
  • Huhn Hardtail, Eurobike 2024 Part 2

Ralf’s “slope chicken” is decked out with a drivetrain from Ingrid, components and a 130mm fork from DT Swiss, Piccola Carbon brakes by Trickstuff, and a suite of bags by Reisefix, a small bagmaker located near Leipzig, Germany. The full weight of the build is 14.7 kilograms, which includes the bags and a seat pack and handlebar pack that aren’t shown. To learn more about Huhn, check out their website here.

Trickstuff Maxima Brakes

While poking around the Trickstuff booth, the silver and bronze Maxima “Alsior” brakes caught my eye. I had heard of Trickstuff’s stoppers before, but this was the first time I had the chance to ogle them in person. I may never be able to afford a pair, but they might be some of the most visually appealing brakes I’ve seen. I’ve also heard these four-piston beauties are quite powerful.

  • Trickstuff Maxima Brakes
  • Trickstuff Maxima Brakes

The Trickstuff Maximas are machined from 7075 aluminum, have 16 and 17mm pistons, and weigh 540 grams per set. Learn more over at Trickstuff.com.


2.4” XC Tires

Tires in the cross-country (XC) category are pretty relevant to bikepacking, especially models with faster center tread and significant side lugs. They work particularly well with drop-bar 29ers and hardtails set up for mixed-surface routes and bikes equipped for ultra-endurance racing. Fortunately, as evidenced by two new tires launched at Eurobike this year, it seems like these tires are getting bigger.

Schwalbe Rick XC, Eurobike 2024

The WTB Macro and the Schwalbe Rick appear to fit the bill for a good bikepacking/mixed-terrain tire, and each have one notable spec in common: they’re both offered in 29 x 2.4”. While that doesn’t seem like that big of a deal on the surface, I think it’s pretty cool that companies are going a little bit bigger with this style of tire, bucking the old 2.1/2.25” XC rocket rubber trend.

  • WTB Macro, Eurobike 2024
  • WTB Macro, Eurobike 2024

Otherwise, the two tires are fairly different. Generally speaking, the Macro has slightly beefier lugs, kind of like a trimmed-down Ikon. It also has bigger side knobs than the Rick, and it comes with either a tan sidewall or in black. WTB claims to have shored up the sidewall with “SG” protection, too. You can learn more about it in our Dispatch here.

  • Schwalbe Rick XC, Eurobike 2024
  • Schwalbe Rick XC, Eurobike 2024

The Schwalbe Rick looks like a grown up Thunder Burt. I’ve spent plenty of time on Thunder Burts, including a ride across Cuba, and I generally like them, so I’m happy to see a slightly beefier model. Schwalbe actually designed them to fill the gap between Racing Ralph and Thunder Burt—making it faster than Racing Ralph but with more grip than Thunder Burt. It has a reinforced “SnakeBite” protection in the transition area between center and shoulder lugs, has Addix Speedgrip tread compound, and weighs 760 grams, according to Schwalbe.

Obviously, the big question is how durable these tires are. We hope to test them both to find out.

Kronfeld Tragflache Cargo Rack

In hall 8, Eurobike reserved a pretty substantial corner they called the Start Up Area, which featured a couple dozen fledgling companies showcasing their products and ideas. One of the first cool things I stumbled on was the Tragfläche, a new cargo rack by Kronfeld from Berlin.

  • Kronfeld Tragflache Cargo Rack, Eurobike 2024
  • Kronfeld Tragflache Cargo Rack, Eurobike 2024

The Kronfeld Tragfläche (which translates to wing) obviously isn’t a typical rear bicycle rack. Instead, founder Karl Kronfeld designed this carrier to convert a normal bike into a cargo bike. It accomplishes this by using different-sized steel tubing and a telescoping design that allows the rear half of the rack to slide out, expanding the rack an additional 25 centimeters in length, allowing it to carry two standard-size panniers on each side and up to 40 kilograms in total.

  • Kronfeld Tragflache Cargo Rack, Eurobike 2024
  • Kronfeld Tragflache Cargo Rack, Eurobike 2024

The Kronfeld Tragfläche rack started as a student project at the College of Brandenburg and has since undergone multiple prototypes and testing, verifying requirements for precision, durability, and torsional rigidity—and also cost optimization in production. As of Eurobike, it’s now set to become a reality as a business. During the event, Kronfeld launched a kickstarter-style campaign on July 6th at StartNext, which you can participate in to help fund this initiative and get one of the carriers with early bird pricing. Find that here and see more details about the rack here.

New Tools from Daysaver

Just around the corner in the Start Up Area, I spotted a familiar name in a small booth. Daysaver is a small company based in Zurich, Switzerland, that we’ve featured on the site before. Some of you may have seen their Essential8 tool and Coworking5. I was impressed after seeing these tools in person. They’re surprisingly intricate and the new tools and prototypes they had on display were even more interesting.

  • Daysaver Tools, Eurobike 2024
  • Daysaver Tools, Eurobike 2024
  • Daysaver Tools, Eurobike 2024

Daysaver gave me a demonstration of two new tools, which are now on preorder. The IncredibleX and Coworking7SL tools have cylindrical form factor that’s different from their other tools. The idea is that these tools can store in handlebars and pumps (which they also showed me, but those are yet to be released). They’re both loaded with functions and have an interesting patented lock mechanism and some very cool bits. We’ll likely review one in the future, and in the meantime you can find details about these tools and pre-order one of your own over at Daysaver.fun.

More Stashable Tools and Granite Duet

From a bikepacking lens, it seems like there were two product trends that dozens of brands were promoting this year. One was quick-release bags and carriers, as you can see in the launches from Restrap and others, and the other was tools that stash in handlebars or other cavities on the bike, which is similar to the new Daysaver IncredibleX above. There were dozens of them, it seemed, including offerings from Topeak, Granite Designs, and Ryder shown below.

  • Granite Tools, Eurobike 2024
  • Granite Tools, Eurobike 2024
  • Stashable Tools
  • Granite Tools, Eurobike 2024
Granite Tools, Eurobike 2024

Unrelated but adjacent, Granite Designs was also showing off a new EDC tool kit they called Duet at their booth that I thought was worth sharing. They don’t have the details on their site quite yet, but the kit included a nicely made ratchet, a full set of Allen and Torx bits, an extender, and a set of sockets ranging from 6-13mm.

Omnium Minimax

I spent some quality hang time with the Omnium team at Eurobike. That included an excellent pizza party meetup on the banks of the River Main one evening and a fair amount of time ogling and shooting the bikes they had on display at their indoor booth and outdoor demo tent. One of those bikes is the popular Mini Max, a shorter and slightly more svelte version of their flagship cargo bike. This particular build was built for dirt and fitted with burly mountain bike tires—a 29 x 2.4” Big Betty in the back and a 20 x 2.25” Big Betty up front—a 1×11 drivetrain, and a lever-actuated dropper post.

Omnium Mini Max, Eurobike 2024
  • Omnium Mini Max, Eurobike 2024
  • Omnium Mini Max, Eurobike 2024
  • Omnium Mini Max, Eurobike 2024
  • Omnium Mini Max, Eurobike 2024
  • Omnium Mini Max, Eurobike 2024

The big news from Omnium at Eurobike was their new hinged rack. One major drawback of front-loading platform cargo bikes is the amount of space they take up, namely the width of the platform. The new hinged rack that was teased at the show, which Omnium says is coming soon, solves this problem by allowing the rack to rotate and sit flat against a wall, the perfect solution for city-dwellers or for space-challenged bike storage.

  • Omnium Mini Max, Eurobike 2024
  • Omnium Tall Bike
Also on display, Omnium showcased a few amazing finishes, plus a sweet tall bike hidden away at the Gates Carbon Drive booth.

To learn more about the Mini-Max, click here. And stay tuned, as we’ll make sure to plug the hinged rack when it surfaces on their website.

Omnium Mini

The other ridiculously cute bike Omnium had on hand was this titanium Mini. I had a chance to sneak it away for a quick pedal and photoshoot and found myself wanting one almost as bad as I want the Mini-Max above. The thing about the Mini is that it’s just a normal bike with a big front rack. It has familiar handling and is made to carry larger loads that you can keep an eye on while riding. Omnium claims that significant loads on the mini are a non-issue as long as they kept within the rack‘s size.

Omnium Mini, Eurobike 2024
  • Omnium Mini, Eurobike 2024
  • Omnium Mini, Eurobike 2024
  • Omnium Mini, Eurobike 2024
  • Omnium Mini, Eurobike 2024
  • Omnium Mini, Eurobike 2024

This particular build was pretty cool, to say the least. It had the same tire combo as the Mini-Max above, a wide-range 1x Ingrid drivetrain, color-matched I9 hubs and Chris King bits, and those sweet Trickstuff Maxima brakes I raved about early on in this post. Find more about the Omnium Mini V3 over at OmniumCargo.com.

Purple Dog Dynamo Light

Another interesting section that Eurobike set aside was called the Handmade Area, although I’d argue that that’s not the best word choice for what was intended—most bikes are handmade, after all, even the ones made in Taiwan. At any rate, the Handmade Area consisted of about 30 modest booths, each reserved for small, independent frame builders and makers. I ran into Nikola Banshiki from Purple Dog Custom here. He had the bike on display that we just featured in our coverage of the 2024 Concours de Machines, which you can find here. He was showing his new Companion dynamo light, the end product of a four-year project that’s finally come to fruition after a lot of prototyping and testing. We actually highlighted the former prototype of this light in last year’s Bespoked roundup, but this version has a finished housing that gives it a more refined look.

  • Purple Dog Dynamo Light
  • Purple Dog Dynamo Light
  • Purple Dog Dynamo Light
  • Purple Dog Dynamo Light

Nikola admits that he set out to create a better version of the Sinewave Beacon, and one thing that sets his Companion Bikepacking Dynamo Light apart is that it has three brightness settings that put out roughly 160/320/640 lumens. It also has an internal 1600mAh buffer battery that allows you charge devices via the integrated USB-C port at any speed and even when stopped. The Companion can also be used as a flashlight and can be mounted on helmets for further flexibility. Find more details on the Companion Bikepacking Dynamo Light here.

2 Rads

Also in the Handmade Area, I spotted some colorful bags on an old Kona Fire Mountain that called for closer inspection. That’s where I met Iliana Großkreutz, founder and maker behind 2 Rads Bikebags, which has a fun logo showing two rats that form a wheel shape. 2 Rads is in Mainz, Germany, and makes a variety of bikepacking bags, including custom frame bags, seat bags, top-openers, basket bags, and accessory bags, all of which are made custom.

  • 2 Rads Bikepacking Bags
  • 2 Rads Bikepacking Bags
  • 2 Rads Bikepacking Bags
  • 2 Rads Bikepacking Bags
  • 2 Rads Bikepacking Bags

Iliana went to school for dressmaking and was working in the field of tailoring for a while. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Iliana started bikepacking and began sewing bags. Friends took notice and wanted bags for themselves, so 2 Rads Bikebags was born as a result. For more on 2 Rads, be sure to give them a follow in Instagram @2rads_bikebags, and check out their sewing, up-cycling and repairing classes, too.

Unpaved Victor

Around the corner from 2 Rads, I came across one of my favorite bikes I saw at the show. There, I met the builder of the Dutch brand Unpaved Cycles, Michiel Burgerhout. Michiel has been welding custom steel bikes under Project12 Cycleworks since 2016 and more recently decided to start a new brand as an umbrella for his bikes. Unpaved will focus on specific models with options for custom sizing or geometry, all handmade at near Nijmegen, in the Netherlands, using Reynolds and Columbus tubing.

Unpaved Victor, Eurobike 2024
  • Unpaved Victor, Eurobike 2024
  • Unpaved Victor, Eurobike 2024

The first bike that will be released later this year is Victor, an evolution of Project12’s successful XC+ bike. Victor looks like a great bikepacking bike featuring 99mm (or less) of rear travel, a 130mm fork, and progressive downcountry geometry. Michiel described Victor as a capable and fun XC bike, perfect for the flowy singletrack but rugged enough for bigger backcountry rides.

  • Unpaved Victor, Eurobike 2024
  • Unpaved Victor, Eurobike 2024
  • Unpaved Victor, Eurobike 2024
  • Unpaved Victor, Eurobike 2024
  • Unpaved Victor, Eurobike 2024

Michiel is also working on a titanium version of Victor, for the record, and has a bigger 140/125mm or 150/140mm trail bike called Vertigo. Find more details about Unpaved at their website here.

Restrap New Bags and Panniers

Restrap had a few new bags and prototypes on display. They first showed me the new version of their Bar Bag Food Pouch, which they just finished work on and will be launching very soon. The latest iteration forgoes the use of magnetic clip and now has a strap attachment system that allows it to be strapped directly to the bars as an accessory pouch or used as a shoulder bag with the included loops. Stay tuned for more on that when it’s released.

  • Restrap Eurobike 2024
  • Restrap Eurobike 2024
  • Restrap Eurobike 2024
  • Restrap Eurobike 2024
  • Restrap Eurobike 2024

They also gave me a sneak peek at their pannier prototype, which looks pretty sharp. The panniers have a quick-release mechanism and will come in 5- and 10-liter sizes. It also uses a new fabric that shares similarities with the forthcoming down tube bag, which we’ll also be sharing more about soon. The dual fabric combination gives the new bags a handsome look. Stay tuned for more on each of these new bags.

Drust Cargo Bike

As Lucas uncovered during our visit to Drust Cycles’ shop in Berlin, Konstantin Drust’s numerous bike journeys across the Middle East, Asia, and Eastern Europe have deeply influenced his design choices and the types of bicycles he aims to create with the Drust brand. In his first year of operation, his workshop predominantly produced custom bikepacking rigs, built for enduring long rides on challenging terrain. Now, as evidenced in the bike he had on display in the Gates Carbon Drive booth at Eurobike, Konstantin is turning his attention to urban mobility. When I asked Konstantin about this bike, he replied, “I’m planning to launch a cargo bike model sooner (or probably later), and this was my first attempt at prototyping it. I believe and hope that cargo bikes will become a growing part of urban mobility, and the increasing number of available models seems to prove this.”

Drust Cargo Bike, Eurobike 2024
  • Drust Cargo Bike, Eurobike 2024
  • Drust Cargo Bike, Eurobike 2024
  • Drust Cargo Bike, Eurobike 2024
  • Drust Cargo Bike, Eurobike 2024
  • Drust Cargo Bike, Eurobike 2024

The primary focus of this bike’s design is to address the issues commonly found in cargo bikes. Konstantin explained that many existing models compromise a good seating position to maintain a shorter overall length. To counter this, the frame is designed with enough length so that the stem and handlebars don’t extend over the cargo platform. This ensures a high handlebar position, allowing for an upright seated posture, which offers both comfort and a better view during daily commutes. To keep the bike’s overall length shorter, Konstantin decided to use a 26″ rear wheel, with the possibility of opting for a 24″ wheel, even.

The platform is sized to handle daily urban tasks but remains slightly smaller than many other cargo models on the market. While the rack shown was specifically made for a particular box—an old Deutsche Post mail delivery crate—a more versatile rack could be easily fabricated. Additionally, the combination of a Pinion gearbox and a belt drive ensures a long-lasting and low-maintenance drivetrain.

  • Drust Cargo Bike, Eurobike 2024
  • Drust Cargo Bike, Eurobike 2024
Drust Cargo Bike, Eurobike 2024

Konstantin won’t stick to the specific design showcased on this bike. He recognizes the need to simplify the design for easier and faster production while maintaining the overall geometry. For now, this bike will replace the cargo bike he has used for the past eight years, allowing him to identify areas that need adjustments and optimizations. He intends to use it for daily rides with a less specific purpose. Still, as someone who enjoys touring and traveling on his cargo bike, often with his dog, Drust has added matching racks and mounts for anything cages. He envisions these features being an option for the final model.

LEATT Magnesium pedals

Historically, the South African brand Leatt has only offered apparel and protective gear, including helmets, which I’ve used quite a bit. However, Leatt came to Eurobike to show off their all-new 2025 lineup of components, featuring seven new products with a few variations of each. Four of the most significant releases are within their new Ceramag pedal range, consisting of an all-mountain flat pedal, an all-mountain platform SPD, a gravity SPD, and a minimal endurance SPD.

Leatt Pedals, Eurobike 2024
  • Leatt Pedals, Eurobike 2024
  • Leatt Pedals, Eurobike 2024
  • Leatt Pedals, Eurobike 2024

Each of these (except platform SPDs) come in three versions that can be identified by the color. The base 6.0 version of each comes in silver, bronze, or black; those have an aluminum body with a chromoly axle. The mid-tier 8.0 pedals come in flat dark gray called Ceragray) and have a ceramic-coated magnesium body with a chromoly spindle. The white top-tier 8.0Ti model has a ceramic-coated magnesium body and a titanium spindle and comes in an ethereal color called Cerabone. Oh, and the flats come with either a wide 114 x 107mm platform or a narrow 114 x 100mm version.

  • Leatt Pedals, Eurobike 2024
  • Leatt Pedals, Eurobike 2024

There are a lot of options here, so bear with me. Here’s a chart that shows the stated weights and models of each:

  • Flat All Mtn 6.0 (Bronze, Silver, or Black): 381g
  • Flat All Mtn 8.0 (Ceragray): 309g
  • Flat All Mtn 8.0Ti (Cerabone): 256g
  • SPD Endurance 6.0 (Bronze, Silver, or Black): 382g
  • SPD Endurance 8.0 (Ceragray): 354g
  • SPD Endurance 8.0Ti (Cerabone): 298g
  • SPD All Mtn 6.0 (Bronze, Silver, or Black): 466g
  • SPD All Mtn 8.0 (Ceragray): 364g
  • SPD Gravity 6.0 (Bronze, Silver, or Black): 419g
  • SPD Gravity 8.0 (Ceragray): 522g

All in all, I’m pretty impressed with the look of these pedals. The SPDs use the Shimano SPD standard, which is a relief. The flats look okay too. I love the fact that they come in two widths and that they’re concave, although they look a little thick compared to some pedals on the market. Either way, Leatt’s move toward magnesium is interesting. They’re certainly not the first to use this material for pedal platforms, but as they made a point in stating, it’s not only the lightest structural metal, but magnesium is also considered one of the most environmentally friendly materials. Its elements can be abundantly found on Earth and are effortlessly sourced from minerals, brines, and seawater, making it a nearly limitless resource. Unlike carbon fiber, magnesium can be 100% recycled, and it naturally dissolves, leaving no trace in the environment once it’s no longer in use.

LEATT Grips

I’m even more interested in the new Reaflex grips released by the South African brand. From just handling them on the demo bars (which are also new, and I’ll provide details about later in this entry), they seem like they have a lot of potential to be a comfy long-ride grip. Leatt approached these grips with an interesting construction concept. They have a layered construction using a “non-Newtonian” (look it up) rubber compound at the core and a more bulky padded palm area at the rear of the grip to dampen vibrations. Conversely, the front of the grip has a textured surface for grip and control. They honestly look quite comfortable, and I’d be keen to try them, although all of Leatt’s new components won’t be available until October.

Leatt Grips, Eurobike 2024
  • Leatt Grips, Eurobike 2024
  • Leatt Grips, Eurobike 2024
  • Leatt Grips, Eurobike 2024

The Reaflex grips will come in Lava, Peanut, Granite, and Black. Also, the new Least handlebars I mentioned above are made of 7075 aluminum and will have a 35mm clamp diameter, an 800mm width, and a 9° backsweep with either a 38 or 23mm rise.

Qvist Hubs

On Thursday night at the Omnium after party, I had the pleasure to meet several people in the German bike/bikepacking scene who we’ve been in touch with and featured on the site over the years. One of whom was Roman Elsner, the engineer and co-founder of Qvist, a new hub brand based near Dresden, Germany. Qvist is named after the archaic Swedish word for twig, Roman explained as he unveiled several specimens of their fascinating hubs from metal briefcase he brought to the party.

Qvist Hubs
  • Qvist Hubs
  • Qvist Hubs

My immediate impression was that these hubs are really nice looking, with several well-chosen colors. But what makes Qvist Hubs unique is what’s inside: the rider/engineer-owned company’s patent-pending double ratchet system. In a nutshell, the system that Roman helped design incorporates two outer ratchet rings, each with 60 teeth, and a double-sided center ratchet ring that’s anchored in place by the hub shell. The the two outer ratchets engage alternately, so at any given time only one side of the ratchet system is engaged. This mechanism effectively doubles the number of engagement points to 120 with an engagement angle of three degrees, which Roman explained was a sweet spot that they committed to after exploring several options.

  • Qvist Hubs
  • Qvist Hubs
  • Qvist Hubs

The freehub shaft transmits driving force through the outer ratchet rings to the double-sided center ratchet ring and then to the hub body. Roman described that by positioning the mechanism inside the hub body, behind the large hub body bearing, it’s designed to improve bearing life due to a more even load distribution. It’s an impressive design and concept, and even better, it’s all made in-house in Germany. To learn more about Qvist and this hub, head to their website here.

3d-printed Hubs

The Dutch brand Scope has another interesting hub on display, albeit far more off the deep end of reality than Qvists’s. Scope’s new Artech hub is 3D-printed from Scalmalloy, an aerospace alloy, which when inspected closely, looked more like an H.R. Giger diorama than a bike component.

Scope 3d Printed Hubs, Eurobike 2024
  • Scope 3d Printed Hubs, Eurobike 2024
  • Scope 3d Printed Hubs, Eurobike 2024

Most of the other choices in this roundup I considered as useful product updates, but I’m posting this one out of sheer awe, frankly. After all, this is a road hub that’s only sold within a wheelset that starts at $3,634. For details on the tech, check out Scope’s website here.

Klickfix Fork Packs and Top Tube Pack

As far as bike bags go, Klickfix is one of the original “quick-release” interfaces on the market. As far as I can recall, they had a click-in bag-mounting system available before Fidlock or other bike accessory makers started creating similar button-release attachment systems. When I saw they had a booth at Eurobike along with their sister brand Rixen and Kaul, I thought it was worth looking into. Apparently, they’ve been busy creating new types of quick-release interfaces. They had a full bikepacking bag setup on display that included a seat pack and a handlebar cradle. I looked at both of those, but they seemed a little rattly on first inspection. However, their new Duo Adapter mount seems somewhat promising. This slim mount bolts directly to a pair of bottle bosses and provides a pretty simple, and seemingly secure, attachment for the fork pack and top tube pack by Rixen and Kaul, in addition to other accessories.

Klickfix fork packs, 2024 Eurobike products
  • Klickfix fork packs, 2024 Eurobike products
  • Klickfix fork packs, 2024 Eurobike products
  • Klickfix fork packs, 2024 Eurobike products
  • Klickfix fork packs, 2024 Eurobike products
  • Klickfix fork packs, 2024 Eurobike products

The fork packs have a unique oval profile and appear to be made out of a waterproof TPU-coated material. The top tube bag is nothing special, aside from the QR mount.

Looking at their website, the four-liter Bikepack Fork Waterproof bags each measure 15cm x 12cm x 28cm, weigh 450 grams, and can carry up to three kilograms. They sell for 79.95€ each and come with the Duo Adapter. The top tube bag measures 6.5cm x 22cm x 10.5cm with a volume of about one liter. It also includes the Duo Adapter for 72.50€. I’m pretty sure they’re both made overseas, but you can dig in more at Klickfix.com.

Manitou R8 fork

Manitou released the latest version of their R—series fork. As its name implies, the R8 is one step above the R7 and gets few improvements, including a significantly reduced weight. The new 1450-gram R8 Pro weighs almost 200 grams less than the 1648-gram R7, despite its 2mm larger stanchions and claimed stiffer construction (34 vs 32mm on the R7).

  • Manitou R8 Fork, Eurobike 2024
  • Manitou R8 Fork, Eurobike 2024
  • Manitou R8 Fork, Eurobike 2024
  • Manitou R8 Fork, Eurobike 2024
  • Manitou R8 Fork, Eurobike

The R8 can be configured in 10mm increments from 80-120mm and has a revamped VTT Pro-X damper with a three-position compression dial. I didn’t get photos of the $999 version with the dials on the fork crown, but apparently it has a smaller dial on top used to adjust the low-speed compression in the open mode and a second dial to change both high- and low-speed damping. There’s apparently also a position to provide a full lockout. The remote lockout version shown here has a three-position lockout.

The Manitou R8 Pro sells for $999 with the manual dial and 1099 for the remote lockout option. Find details here.

Fidlock Stainless Bottles and Cargo Cage

I found myself stumbling around the Fidlock exhibit in hall 12.1 on a couple occasions. It was loaded with interesting connectors and buckles that were hard to make heads or tails of, so I’m glad I returned when the crowd thinned out to chat with one of their reps and learn about a few new things the company just launched. One of those products is a new line of stainless steel bottles, which might make a few Fidlock-curious Klean Kanteen fans happy. They’re not yet available, but the plan is to offer them in two sizes: 500ml and 700ml in silver, black, mint green, and yellow.

  • Fidlock Buckles, Eurobike 2024
  • Fidlock Stainless Bottles, Eurobike 2024
  • Fidlock Cargo Cage, Eurobike 2024
  • Fidlock Cargo Cage, Eurobike 2024
Fidlock Cargo Cage, Eurobike 2024

Another new product they showed me was a cargo cage, their take on this popular accessory that seems like something every brand is scrambling to release. The Fidlock version is complete with, you guessed it, a new Fidlock adapter. However, this one’s a little different. It has adjustable mounting options and can work with three mounting bolts or be attached using the included heavy-duty zip ties. An additional interesting feature on the cage adapter is a lock out. You simply push in the lever and it locks the knobs in place so they can disengage when loaded down with gear. We’ll keep you posed when this product is available.

Kromer Bikes

Founded by Eduard Krömer right here in Frankfurt, Krömer Frames has been building bikes since 2013. He had two sweet-looking gravel bikes on display when I stumbled on his booth in the Handmade area. Both had these unique offset set stays and some incredible finish work.

  • Kromer Bikes, Eurobike 2024
  • Kromer Bikes, Eurobike 2024
  • Kromer Bikes, Eurobike 2024
  • Kromer Bikes, Eurobike 2024

That’s about all I know about this brand; the pictures will have to speak for themselves since there was no one at the booth when I stopped by. You can learn more about the brand at their website here.

Ti Everywhere

I was pretty amazed by how much titanium I saw at Eurobike. It seemed to be everywhere. From 3D-printed frame parts to forks, there was a seemingly endless supply. One standout was these cranks from Ora, a popular Ti manufacturer in Taiwan. They obviously look a lot like eeWings, but they have a couple unique features. I don’t think they’re available quite yet, however.

  • Ora ti Cranks
  • Ora ti Cranks
  • Ora ti Cranks
  • Ora ti Cranks

Familiar Faces and Maximum Weirdness

My favorite thing about Eurobike, and what made it well worth the trip, was having the opportunity to meet and connect with a lot of people we’ve featured on the site, folks who’ve shared their writing and photographs here, and friends and members who’ve supported us over the years.

  • Eurobike 2024
  • Eurobike 2024
  • Eurobike 2024
  • Eurobike 2024

I was too busy talking to take photos of all these folks, but it was great to catch up with too many people to list, including Quinda Verhaul, Jon Woodroof, Joergen Trepp, Allan Shaw, Tristan Bogaard and Belén Castelló, and a lot of people behind the brands who’ve supported our efforts, like Old Man Mountain, Revelate Designs, Ortlieb, Restrap, and Tumbleweed.

And then there was the sheer weirdness of it all. There were a lot of battery-powered bikes. I imagine that genre took up half of the space. There were also machines of all shape and size, four-wheel bike-like things, bike-shaped concept vehicles, machines that make bike parts, and everything in between.

  • Eurobike 2024
  • Eurobike 2024
  • Eurobike 2024

On immediate reflection, I’m not sure what to make of it all, to be honest. Big takeaways were that Europe is light years ahead of the US in urban mobility with bikes and bike-like vehicles, and Pinion gearbox drivetrains are catching on like wildfire. However, I certainly didn’t capture the scope of everything that was there. Picture a general sports nutrition vibe fuzed with avant futurism and the Prometheus movie; then blend that with a long tour of downtown Tokyo riding on the back that robot AI dog thing that always pops up in my YouTube feed. That kind of sums up Eurobike, although I admit I liked it in a weird way.

That’s a wrap until next time. Thanks everyone!

Further Reading

Make sure to dig into these related articles for more info...

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