Dynaplug Covert Bar End Tubeless Bicycle Tire Repair Kit: First Look

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Remember the Dynaplug Covert we shared earlier this month? We got our hands on the slick bar end tubeless repair kit for a closer look. Find detailed photos and Miles’ thoughts here…

Announced earlier this month, the new Dynaplug Covert is the latest stashable tubeless tire repair kit from a company that’s made plugging tubeless tires their business. As it happens, I’m a little biased when it comes to tubeless repair tools, because I’ve been a huge Dynaplug fan for a few years. In 2017, I splurged on my first Dynaplug Micro Pro and it’s been an invaluable part of my repair kit ever since. Besides the beautiful machining, design, and US-made label, their brass-tipped plugs have worked quickly and reliably on more than a few occasions. In fact, a few days ago we had a puncture in our group that wouldn’t seal up on its own, but wasn’t big enough to get your standard bacon and fork style plugger inserted. Dynaplug to the rescue—push, pull, done!

Dynaplug Covert Review

The Dynaplug Covert tool is designed specifically to work with ODI lock-on grips that utilize their Snap Cap end caps. When purchased through Dynaplug, you receive a free set of ODI grips and Covert tools for each grip—replacing the need for Snap Caps in the process. An aluminum threaded sleeve is held tightly in place by the locking jaws of the grips, which provides a secure place for the main tool to thread into. After unthreading the tool, the applicator is accessed by removing an additional sleeve, which is held snugly in place by an O-ring on the applicator.

The Covert tool uses Dynaplug’s Twin Tube applicator, which holds two easily accessed plugs at once. The photos below show their Standard Plug on the left and Mega Plug on the right. The latter is better suited for larger holes in tubeless tires, being approximately three times the thickness of a standard plug. Dynaplug’s plugs are made of a viscoelastic rubber impregnated cord, which in my experience do a great job at soaking up tubeless sealant and forming a solid patch in the tire. Dynaplug claims a repair can last the life of your tire if installed correctly. I’ve had some last an entire summer of bikepacking, never requiring any further maintenance after the fact.

  • Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review

The machining and overall quality of the Dynaplug Covert tool is top notch. The threaded portion is smooth, and with the addition of the two O-rings, the components stay put. Although I’ve only ridden with the Covert tool on quick trips close to town, I expect to have a similar experience on longer, rougher rides. Since the end cap / handle isn’t particularly low-profile, it provides a decent grip that’s easy to remove. More importantly, it doesn’t require any tools to remove, which is one of the complaints I had with the Granite Design Stash Tire Plug tool I reviewed earlier this year.

These details, paired with a simple and so effective tubeless plugging function, make it a very well-rounded tool. However, unlike my Dynaplug Micro Pro (see photos above), the Covert doesn’t have any additional storage for extra plugs besides what’s already loaded, so you might want to pack some extras close by. Those running the tool in both bar ends might not be as concerned.

Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review

Based on my experiences, I don’t have much negative feedback about the Covert tool. The main issue is its compatibility, or lack thereof, since it’s designed specifically for ODI lock-on grips. I don’t ride anywhere for more than a day without my Ergon grips, so personally I’d reserve the Covert for my daily driver or commuter. The ODI Vans Lock-On Grips do have quite a cult following though, so presumably loads of people are stoked on this pairing. I will say they are reasonably comfortable and surprisingly grippy for a non-ergonomic grip, and who can argue with the classic Vans waffle sole pattern. Currently, I have the grips installed on my new Velo Orange Klunker bar, which has been great a combination for my Kuwahara Cascade commuter.

The only other issue worth highlighting is that the tool is rather exposed on the end of the bars, so those who are constantly laying their bike over or like to spend time on narrowed forested trails will likely scuff the end of the tool up pretty quickly. Of course this will only effect aesthetics, not the tool’s function. I consciously put the Covert Tool I tested on my drive side knowing I’d eventually lay my bike down at some point, so it kind of works out well that I was sent half of the complete kit.

  • Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review

Pros

  • Made in the USA
  • Precise machining and thoughtful design
  • No small bits to lose or fiddle with
  • Lightweight and compact

Cons

  • No storage for extra plugs
  • Bar ends are exposed and will eventually see some impacts
  • Only compatible with ODI lock-on grips
  • Material: Anodized Billet 6061 Aluminum, Hardened 304 Stainless Steel, Viscoelastic Impregnated Rubber
  • Weight: 38.5 grams loaded (2 tools)
  • Place of Manufacture: USA
  • Price: $69.99 USD
  • Manufacturer’s Details: Dynaplug.com
Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review
  • Dynaplug Covert Review

Wrap Up

The Dynaplug Covert is a well thought out tool. The overall quality and attention to detail are readily apparent, and its design makes for perhaps the quickest accessed tubeless repair tool on the market. I think the biggest selling point is Dynaplug’s brass-tipped plugs and applicator which, as I mentioned above, have saved me on numerous bikepacking trips and day rides over the years. Although I still think I prefer packing my Dynaplug Micro Pro for bikepacking trips, since it offers a few more functions, the Covert is a slick little device that will likely end up on my daily driver this winter. It would be awesome to see an updated version with more grip compatibility options, which would probably make the kit more appealing to bikepackers.

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