Showers Pass Crosspoint Waterproof Wool Socks and Gloves Review

The Showers Pass Crosspoint Waterproof Socks and Gloves utilize a soft knit fabric, waterproof membrane, and moisture wicking lining to keep your extremities warm and dry on the wettest of days. Miles got his hands (and feet) on both for a mix of all-weather commuting and gravel exploration. Read his thoughts here…

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With a focus on waterproof-breathable garments for cycling, Portland-based Showers Pass is in the business of getting people outside on their bikes, no matter the weather. While their mission isn’t out of the ordinary, their Crosspoint Waterproof Gloves and Mountain Socks feature a comfortable, soft knit fabric that’s quite unique.

I was interested to see just how well they worked, and I’ve been using both the gloves and socks for several months, through a rainy winter on British Columbia’s West Coast and as a reassurance for spring bikepacking trips, as well as some recent day rides. Although my focus is using the Crosspoint Waterproof Mountain Socks and Knit Wool Gloves while riding a bike, Showers Pass is quick to acknowledge their versatility. That’s to say, they’ll likely perform similarly for hiking, working outdoors, or any time you’d prefer warm, dry, hands and feet.

Showers Pass Crosspoint Waterproof Knit Wool Gloves

Showers Pass Waterproof Socks Gloves
  • Showers Pass Waterproof Socks Gloves
  • Showers Pass Waterproof Crosspoint Gloves

Both the Crosspoint Waterproof Mountain Socks and Waterproof Knit Wool Gloves rely on a proprietary three-layer construction to provide a fully waterproof, stretchable garment that can still wick excess moisture when things warm up. The exterior of the gloves is a wear-resistant knitted nylon that looks and feels like your standard knitted glove. Silicone prints on the palm and fingers help provide grip in wet conditions, and although the added traction was almost too much in some cases, it was nice to know my hands wouldn’t be slipping and sliding around while riding in the rain. Next is a waterproof-breathable Artex membrane that’s designed to keep the weather out, yet still allow your hands to breathe, followed by an antibacterial merino wool lining to wick moisture buildup away from your hands.

The first thing that stood out for me was how incredibly stretchy the gloves are. They’ve got a lot of give, which made it easy to shift, brake, and use your hands in general. The knitted finish of the gloves is also pretty interesting, and likely has people wondering how on earth something so soft and stretchy could be waterproof. Waterproof-breathables have come along way in the last several years, and we’re seeing a lot of outdoor gear and cycling apparel manufacturers introducing ultra-stretchy jackets that still boast 100% waterproof designs. Patagonia’s Stretch Rainshadow Jacket comes to mind, it weighs just over 10oz, is fully waterproof, and offers a level of stretch that’s not uncommon in most standard lightweight shells. Often these modern rain shells are soft to the touch, making them a bit more comfortable to wear, less crinkly, and not as plastic feeling against your skin.

  • Showers Pass Waterproof Socks Gloves
  • Showers Pass Waterproof Socks Gloves
  • Showers Pass Waterproof Knit Wool Gloves

These are definitely waterproof gloves, and did a great job at keeping my hands dry on milder days this winter. They are much more breathable than other waterproof gloves I’ve used in the past, including Outdoor Research’s Versaliner Glove, which I have recommended to many people looking for a two-piece waterproof glove that can also keep your hands warm when needed. However, due to the knitted design, there’s no weather wicking exterior to shed water off the outside of the glove. So, the exterior layer does soak up a certain amount of precipitation on especially wet rides, giving the impression of a leaky glove and can also pull the warmth right out of your finger tips. For this reason, I’d reserve the Showers Pass Waterproof Knit Wool Gloves for milder wet-weather bikepacking, let’s say around 40-50ºF or warmer. Showers Pass also offers an option without the wool liner, check that out here.

Pros

  • Knitted three-layer design is both stretchy and comfortable.
  • Great breathability.
  • Versatile, and not just for bikepacking!

Cons

  • Exterior nylon layer doesn’t shed water and can ‘soak up’ on long wet rides.
  • Not a winter glove. Only suitable for 40-50ºF or warmer.
  • Material: Nylon / Rubber Exterior, Wool / Acrylic Interior
  • Weight: 80g
  • Price: $40 USD
  • Manufacture’s Details: ShowersPass.com

Showers Pass Crosspoint Waterproof Mountain Socks

As mentioned above, the Crosspoint Waterproof Mountain Socks share the exact same construction as the Waterproof Knit Wool Gloves: a wear-resistant nylon exterior, followed by a waterproof breathable membrane, and a merino wool interior next to skin. In use they performed similarly to the gloves, but due to the added thickness of the sock, I didn’t have as much luck in the cooler temperatures. I’d compare the thickness to that of a heavyweight wool hiking sock, which often requires pre-fitting one’s boots or even going as far as having a separate pair for winter pursuits. The same can be said for the Crosspoint Waterproof Mountain Socks, and it’s too bad I lean towards a snugger fitting cycling shoe, because although I could cram them in on warm days, the lack of wiggle room was unbearable on colder days.

Showers Pass Waterproof Crosspoint Socks
  • Showers Pass Waterproof Crosspoint Socks
  • Showers Pass Waterproof Crosspoint Socks
  • Showers Pass Waterproof Crosspoint Socks

Although they add a bit more bulk than I expected, the Showers Pass Crosspoint Waterproof Mountain Socks are a great addition to my gear bin. It’s nice knowing I have a truly waterproof sock if I need it, and that they are comfortable to wear next to skin. I could see the socks being particularly useful for those with circulation issues, or just have a hard time keeping their feet warm. Just make sure to fit them properly with your shoes!

Showers Pass Waterproof Crosspoint Socks

Pros

  • Knitted three-layer design is both stretchy and comfortable.
  • Great breathability.
  • Good overall fit. Ankle height is appropriate for biking.

Cons

  • Exterior nylon layer doesn’t shed water and can ‘soak up’ on long wet rides.
  • A bit bulky. Might not fit properly with a snug fitting shoe.
  • Material: Nylon / Polyester Exterior, Merino Wool / Acrylic Interior
  • Weight: 100g
  • Price: $45 USD
  • Manufacture’s Details: ShowersPass.com
Showers Pass Waterproof Socks Gloves

Wrap Up

Overall, I’ve been impressed with Showers Pass’ new wool-infused waterproof gloves and socks. The addition of the merino wool blend lining means both garments offer a touch more warmth, potentially keeping your hands and feet dry into late fall and early spring. The knit design is both comfortable and stretchy, and so far much more durable than a traditional waterproof-breathable layer. The only issue I have is the bulk, which is more troublesome with the Crosspoint Waterproof Mountain Socks. This can quickly negate the benefits of a warm, waterproof sock when wearing snug cycling shoes.

In terms of durability, you’ll have to wear through either the liner or exterior knit before the waterproof membrane starts to deteriorate, and since neither garment is likely to be used daily, I’m confident both will have a solid life expectancy. The socks and gloves I’ve been using still look and function perfectly.

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