Jetboil Stash Review: The Complete Kit

The Jetboil Stash is the brand’s lightest and most compact cooking system to date, with the entire kit weighing just over 200g. We’ve been testing one over the past few months to see how it performs as a lightweight bikepacking stove for one to two people. Find Miles’ review here…

The Jetboil Stash Cooking System was announced in January and is described as the lightest stove system the brand has ever made. With a focus on minimal weight and compactness, the Stash packs some promising features into an all-in-one cooking system that runs off of standard isobutane fuel canisters. We were eager to check one out for ourselves, and Jetboil sent one over shortly after the release so we could get a closer look. I’ve taken it along on several spring overnighters and day rides recently to see how it holds up in the real world.

Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review

The Stash is sold as an all-in-one system and includes a 0.8L aluminum pot, plastic lid/strainer, stove, and Jetboil’s fuel stabilizer. The pot features their FluxRing, which is designed to increase the surface area of the pot to spread heat more evenly while decreasing boil times. The stove itself is completely new for Jetboil. It has a titanium burner head, no regulator, and is best suited to boil-only meals and hot drinks. The three pot supports pivot around the burner head when packing away, which results in a very sturdy, wiggle-free setup. Small indents on the supports match up with the FluxRing on the pot, which helps keep the pot in place and centred. There are cerated teeth on the supports for those who want to use a different pot or frying pan, so a FluxRing pot isn’t required, though the system is optimized for use with one.

Jetboil did an excellent job with the packability of the Stash, making it a handy option for stowing away in a frame bag or handlebar bag. The plastic lid has three tabs for securing to the bottom of a 100g fuel canister, which can be attached firmly to avoid unnecessary rattling and keep the edges of the canister (that are prone to rust) away from the pot itself. There isn’t a dedicated strainer on the lid, but there is a small pour spout that might work for some foods. The rubber-coated handle folds up onto the lid during transport and locks into place while in use. It’s sturdy and comfortable to hold, and doubled as my bowl the majority of the time. There are measurement lines on the interior and exterior of the pot, as well as a printed reminder of how to pack the kit away. When packed up, there is only a small amount of room for the stove to move around, and the fabric storage bag does a decent job of keeping the noise down, but stuffing a small rag or handkerchief inside helps create a completely rattle-free setup.

  • Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review
Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review

The Jetboil Stash functioned exactly as intended. It boils water quickly (2.5 min/0.5L), packs down small, and doesn’t weigh much. I haven’t attempted to cook anything more than boil-only meals and drinks, due to the Stash’s lack of regulator, but I’m sure you could whip up some simple meals if you’re attentive. I found the 0.8L pot perfect for solo outings and quick campouts with a friend, and the slightly wider shape was easy to cook and eat out of. I had no problem squeezing the Stash into my Road Runner Wedge Mountain Full Frame Bag and in the Aeroe Quick Mount Pod I recently reviewed. Since it’s wider than other packable pots/stoves, slimmer frame bags might not fit it so well.

Jetboil Stash Actual Weights

  • Pot + Lid: 145 grams
  • Stove + Bag: 65 grams
  • Stabilizer: 23 grams
  • Total Weight: 233 grams
  • Total + Fuel Canister: 444 grams

Besides the $129.95 price tag, I really haven’t found anything I don’t like about the Stash. It’s a no-frills cook system and it’ll boil water fast for the types of trips where dehydrated meals and oatmeal fit the bill. There are obvious limitations with stoves like the Stash, but lots of us don’t expect much more, and I think Jetboil did a great job with the overall design and quality of their latest stove. If you’re looking for a stove that’s better suited for cooking more involved meals, you can find a list of great options here.

Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review
  • Jetboil Stash Review

Pros

  • Unique packable design is nearly rattle-free
  • Lightweight
  • Sturdy when cooking

Cons

  • Expensive for a barebones stove system
  • Wide pot could be tricky to pack for some
  • Pot Size: 0.8L
  • Material: Aluminum / Stainless Steel / Titanium
  • Weight: 233 grams
  • Place of Manufacture: China
  • Price: $129.95 USD
  • Manufacturer’s Details: Jetboil.JohnsonOutdoors.com

Wrap Up

These days, there are a lot of great and reliable stoves out there to choose from. From ultra-packable folding gizmos to more versatile liquid gas options for longer tours and more intricate meals, it’s important to consider what food you want to prepare while bikepacking and then get a stove that makes sense for that. The Jetboil Stash prioritizes packability and weight above all else, which is perfect for about 85% of my trips when boiling water quickly is adequate. With non-essential travel on hold, I expect 2021 will be full of close-to-home overnighters, which means I’ll be prepping most of my food from the comfort of home, leaving room for my folding saw, a thicker air mattress, and other creature comforts. For these types of trips, the Jetboil Stash more than meets my needs. It’s easy to use, sturdy, and has some neat features that make a lot of sense for bikepackers.

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