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Stoves for Bikepacking: A Complete List and Guide

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There are a lot of excellent, compact, and ultralight stoves for bike touring, bikepacking, or even Friday morning #coffeeoutside rides. So, what makes a stove good for bike travel? And which type is the best for particular trips or regions? Find all your questions answered here, alongside a list of over 30 stoves for bike touring and bikepacking, many of which we’ve tested thoroughly.

When selecting (or making) a stove for bike touring or bikepacking, there are several factors to consider. We’ve tried dozens of different stoves and cooking methods over the years, and often bring specific stoves for different trips. For longer outings, the chief deciding factor is what type of fuel will be available to restock along the way. But there are also a few other details to take into account, including temperatures and environmental conditions, carrying space (for fuel and the stove), how many people you plan on cooking for, as well as what types of meals you intend to prepare.

  • Solo Stove Lite review bikepacking
  • Alpkit Kraku Stove and MyTiPot review
  • Bike touring stoves

The three most important logistical variables to consider are:

Space and Weight

While most of the backpacking/bikepacking stoves listed here are fairly svelte, they run the gamut from just 9 grams all the way up to 990. Minimalist bikepackers might prefer to look at the featherweight options to shave grams where they can, but generally speaking, not too many of them are overly heavy. However, packing space is a premium to all of us; you can never have enough space on a bike trip. If you are trying to keep your camp kitchen to a minuscule footprint, consider the size of your pot, stove, and fuel carrying vessel. Ideally, you can completely nest your entire cook kit inside your pot. See the wrap up at the end of this post for some ideas.

Fuel Availability

By and large, fuel availability is the most important factor to consider, and will likely govern which stove you select for a trip. When traveling abroad, this can often be tricky to predict in advance, and can even change from country to country. For example, we were able to find white gas (which is lighter and cleaner) in Mexico, but not in other Central American countries. Cooking alcohol (methylated spirits) is readily available in East Africa, but not in parts of Central Asia. And, to make matters more confusing, it’s available from different types of stores in different countries. Butane canisters are often harder to come by when traveling abroad.

Types of Meals

Another important consideration to mull over is what types of meals you expect to prepare, and what foods will be available on the route(s) you’ll be riding. Obviously, if you’re going to be whipping up culinary delights with more involved ingredients, such as rice or other foods that take a while to cook, you’ll want to bring along more fuel. In addition, you might prefer a stove that has the ability to adjust the heat source to simmer, or one that produces a more even and predictable flame. That’s not always possible with can stoves and some alcohol stoves. Note that the Trangia is one of the only alcohol burners with a simmer ring.

Another factor that’s often overlooked is the environmental impact certain camp stoves can have. Pre-pressurized canisters are inherently wasteful and the larger propane canisters usually end up in landfills. Liquid fuel stoves might be the most environmentally conscious choice since the bottles can be reused and virtually every drop of fuel can be used.

Types of Stoves for Bikepacking

There are essentially five types of stoves for bikepacking and bike touring. Here are the basics about each one, along with their strengths and weaknesses, and where and when they’re best used.

Multi-Fuel Stoves

Pressurized multi-fuel stoves are the most commonly used for long-term bike travelers as they can burn white gas and unleaded gasoline, among other types of fuel. They usually consist of a metal fuel bottle, pressure pump, and burner. Gasoline or diesel is almost always available, so they’re the most foolproof method for cooking. These stoves also offer excellent flame control to allow a wide range of temperatures for simmering and more advanced cooking. However, they are also loud, stinky, dirty, large, and heavy. And they have a lot of moving parts, so it’s important you carry hard-to-find spares (rather than a simple alcohol system).

Spirit Burner Stoves

Spirit burners, such as the Trangia or a DIY can stove, can burn methyl alcohol, medical alcohol, and other spirits that are 70% alcohol or greater (90% and above is ideal). Several of us here agree that these are the best option for international bike travel as they are almost completely silent, clean-burning, and fuel can be found in most countries. However, there are drawbacks. Alcohol doesn’t burn well in cold temps, and there are places where it’s virtually impossible to find. See the bottom of this post for more details on sourcing and carrying cooking alcohol.

Canister Stoves

Canister stoves are popular among weekend bikepackers for their speed and ease of use. However, because pressurized canisters (butane/propane) aren’t always available, they’re not ideal for long-term/international trips. You also can’t fly with pressured canisters, so if traveling abroad, be sure to check that they’re available at your destination.

Wood-Burning

Wood or biomass burning stoves are especially good when traveling in a remote location in a relatively dry climate where wood and twigs are available. That said, consider fire bans and forest fire dangers before setting out with one. Also, note that using a wood-burning stove is fairly time-consuming. Biomass burners are available as both dual-chamber designs and less-efficient flat/packable designs.

Solid Fuel Stoves

Solid fuel stoves are another popular option for minimalist backpackers or as an emergency option. They are easy to light and weigh very little, but provide no flame control and have slow boil times. And they don’t do well with wind. Solid fuel usually comes in the form of small briquette tablets or in a gel tube.

Complete List of Stoves for Bikepacking

There are many stoves that can be purchased (usually $20-200) as well as several designs that are fairly easy to make yourself. In this Gear Index, we list the stoves we’ve tested (marked with a hexagonal “T” icon, as usual) and many that are on our radar. We’ve included key specs for each stove, including packed size, weight, and BTU output, which should assist in making an informed decision for those in the market.

  • $37
    Alpkit Kraku

    Alpkit Kraku

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane
    • Output: 8871 BTU
    • Pack Size: 1.3 × 2" (3 × 5cm)

    Weighing just 45g, the Alpkit Kraku is described as a “ultra-compact titanium micro camping stove,” designed for solo pursuits when pack size is important. The Kraku is made from titanium, aluminum, and brass to keep the overall weight down, uses a spring control valve, and has three foldable pot supports that work well with pots at least 6.5cm in diameter. Despite its size, the Kraku pumps out around 8,900 BTU and performs similarly to stoves twice its size.

    • Alpkit Kraku Stove and MyTiPot review
    • Alpkit Kraku Stove and MyTiPot review
    • Alpkit Kraku Stove and MyTiPot review

    From Cass’ Review: Alpkit has earned itself a solid reputation in the UK for getting people out into the outdoors affordably: it makes no-nonsense products that generally do a very good job, without incurring the premium price we often associate with specialist camping gear. In this regard, the Kraku certainly fits neatly into Alpkit’s product line. If a gas canister stove works best for you, I have no hesitation in recommending it for general bikepacking use, outside of extreme conditions. I’ve used it throughout the summer on short overnighters or just carried it to places where I wasn’t completely sure I’d end up needing to cook. And I’ve chatted to others who report no issues after more than a year of regular use on the shoulder seasons too.

    • Weight: 45 grams (1.6 oz)
    • Price: $37
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • DIY Can Stove

    DIY Can Stove

    • Type: Spirit burner
    • Fuel Types: Alcohol (Methyl spirits)
    • Material: Aluminum
    • Pack Size: 2.5 × 2.5” (6.5 × 6.5cm)

    It’s hard to argue with the practicality, cost, and minimal weight of a DIY can stove. They’re relatively easy to make (with nothing more than a pocket knife) and some designs can even act as their own pot stand. Several years ago, we made five different options from our favorite beer cans and tested them out. Find the complete tutorial here.

    • Weight: 10 grams (0.4 oz)
    • Place of Manufacture: Anywhere
    ^ Close
  • $40
    Evernew Titanium Alcohol Stove

    Evernew Titanium Alcohol Stove

    • Type: Spirit Burner Stove
    • Fuel Types: Denatured Alcohol
    • Material: Titanium
    • Pack Size: 2.8 × 1.65” (7 × 4cm)

    The Evernew Titanium Alcohol Stove is an incredibly lightweight spirit-burning stove with a unique bi-level jet system that is designed to provide a more even flame. It provides 70ml of fuel capacity, and Evernew claims 30ml of alcohol will boil 400ml of water in approximately five minutes. Although the stove functions as is, there are optional pot stands and windscreens available that will boost the performance of the stove without adding much more weight or bulk.

    From Christophe’s review: Like all uber-light things, it’s not enough to just present a low gram count. Any stove, regardless of weight, still has to perform. The Appalachian Set is without a doubt a star performer. Boil times, although variable due to ambient temperature, humidity, and altitude, are impressively quick. Alcohol stoves are easily thwarted by mild breezes, and the Appalachian does better than expected in those conditions thanks to the smart design of the two-piece wind shroud. Naturally, it does best with as much wind protection as possible, but on its own, it does admirably as long as it’s just mildly breezy.

    • Evernew Ti Apalachian potset review
    • Evernew Ti Apalachian potset review
    • Evernew Ti Apalachian potset review
    • Weight: 34 grams (1.2 oz)
    • Price: $40
    • Place of Manufacture: Japan
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $49.95
    GSI Pinnacle Canister Stove

    GSI Pinnacle Canister Stove

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane
    • Output: 9,629 BTU
    • Pack Size: 3 × 2.1" (8 × 5cm)

    The GSI Pinnacle Canister Stove is an ultralight, high-efficiency stove for when space is at a premium. It features three folding pot supports that pack away during storage, has a high 9,629 BTU output, and is designed to pair with GSI’s nForm Ultralight cookware with integrated windscreens for maximum efficiency.

    Miles’ Thoughts: Although I haven’t been using the GSI Pinnacle Canister Stove for that long, I can tell you that I appreciate how small it packs and just how solid it feels—this little stove appears to be manufactured to last. However, the loosely pivoting legs are awkward to use and result in a slightly less stable setup than other folding canister stoves I’ve used in the past. The legs tend to rattle around, which when packed in a frame bag, can get pretty annoying. It’s also a fairly tall stove, sitting high above the fuel canister, which makes it more susceptible to wind and not as stable with larger pots.

    • Gsi Pinnacle Canister Stove
    • Gsi Pinnacle Canister Stove
    • Gsi Pinnacle Canister Stove
    • Gsi Pinnacle Canister Stove
    • Gsi Pinnacle Canister Stove
    • Weight: 68 grams (2.4 oz)
    • Price: $49.95
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $119.95
    Jetboil Flash (Java)

    Jetboil Flash (Java)

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane Mix
    • Output: 9,000 BTU
    • Pack Size: 4.1 × 7.1" (10 × 18cm)

    The Jetboil Flash Cooking System is their fastest boiling all-on-one stove they offer, making it a great option for fast, simple meals and morning coffee. The kit comes with a 1L pot / cup with their FluxRing heat reflector, and insulated cover, small bowl / measuring cup, and a fuel canister stabilizer. The Flash can boil 500ml of water in just 100 seconds, which is the fastest boiling time Jetboil offers. They also offer a line of accessories that work with the Flash, including a coffee press, larger pots and a hanging kit.

    • Jetboil Flash Java Review, Stoves for Bikepacking
    • Jetboil Flash Java Review, Stoves for Bikepacking
    • Jetboil Flash Java Review, Stoves for Bikepacking
    • Jetboil Flash Java Review, Stoves for Bikepacking
    • Jetboil Flash Java Review, Stoves for Bikepacking

    Logan’s Thoughts: I’ve always been skeptical of the Jetboil products; they look kind of overbuilt and a little gimmicky. However, I was talked into testing the Jetboil Flash Java kit and can honestly say that I’m impressed. On many of our local overnighter rides, I tend to go a little toward the “bike clamping” side of the spectrum, which for me means bringing an ultralight camp chair, some beer, real coffee, and good food. On our last trip, I brought the Flash Java and will report that it’s fast, pretty easy to use, and makes a good cup of coffee—well, two cups of coffee, which is even better. The two-piece plunger stick, filter, burner, canister stand, and a small butane canister all fit inside the 1-liter cooking cup. Pros include an easy French press coffee maker, a well-designed canister stand, quick boil time, and an all-in-one system. Cons would be that at 411 grams (14.5 oz), it’s a little on the heavy side, and removing the cup from the burner is a little awkward.

    • Weight: 411 grams (14.5 oz)
    • Price: $119.95 (Java Kit)
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  REI  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $144.95
    Jetboil MicroMo

    Jetboil MicroMo

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane Mix
    • Output: 6,000 BTU
    • Pack Size: 4.1 × 6.25” (10 × 16cm)

    Part of Jetboil’s Mo series of stoves, the MicroMo is their lightest all-in-one cooking system. Just like all of their stoves, it’s designed around a proprietary regulator / windscreen, 0.8L pot, a insulating cozy with handle, and fuel canister supports for extra stability. The best part is that all of these components, including a small fuel canister, all nest inside the pot for easy transport and packing. It also includes a small plastic bowl that doubles as a measuring cup, that nests around the regulator when packed away. The entire system weighs just 340g, plus the weight of a fuel canister, which is pretty impressive for a complete lightweight system.

    • Jetboil MicroMo
    • Jetboil MicroMo
    • Jetboil MicroMo
    • Jetboil MicroMo
    • Jetboil MicroMo

    Miles’ Thoughts: Although I’ve only used the MicroMo on a couple coffee outside meetups, I’m a fan of its weight and size. For a complete system on solo excursions, it’s a great little setup, and the regulator / windscreen is noticeable in windy conditions. I only wish the plastic lid actually stayed on the pot during transport as it fits very loosely and has a tendency to fall off when riding bumpy roads or trails. The included plastic bowl and support legs are a great bonus and nice to see.

    • Weight: 340 grams (12 oz)
    • Price: $144.95
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  REI  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $44.95
    MSR PocketRocket 2

    MSR PocketRocket 2

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane
    • Output: 8,200 BTU
    • Pack Size: 1.7 × 1.5 × 3” (4 × 4 × 8cm)

    A favourite among bikepackers, the MSR PocketRocket 2 is an ultra compact canister stove with dual-hinged folding arms that allow it to pack down impressively small. Even with the extra hinges, Logan has found the PocketRocket 2 to be quite sturdy and still able to boil water fast. It includes a small plastic carrying case and weighs just 83g.

    From Logan’s review: The new MSR PocketRocket 2 is hands down the best compact canister stove I’ve tried to date, hence the fact that it was awarded a spot in our Gear of The Year post. The pot supports are sturdy and well designed. It boils water fast and seems fairly stable given its diminutive size and weight. If I had to come up with a complaint it would be that it’s quite loud for a little stove. But considering how fast it boils water, that’s a fair tradeoff.

    • MSR Pocket Rocket 2, review, bikepacking stove
    • MSR Pocket Rocket 2, review, bikepacking stove
    • MSR Pocket Rocket 2, review, bikepacking stove
    • MSR Pocket Rocket 2, review, bikepacking stove
    • MSR Pocket Rocket 2, review, bikepacking stove
    • Weight: 83 grams (2.9 oz)
    • Price: $44.95
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  REI  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $99.95
    MSR Whisperlite International

    MSR Whisperlite International

    • Type: Multi-Fuel Stove
    • Fuel Types: White gas, kerosene and unleaded gasoline
    • Output: 9,500 BTU (white gas)
    • Pack Size: 7 × 6 × 3.5″ (18 × 15 × 9cm)

    The Whisperlite is probably the most popular multi-fuel stove on the market, and the simplest. Like other multi-fuel options, it requires a few parts and pieces to operate and maintain: a windscreen, spare parts kit, pump, and specific type of fuel bottle. The Whisperlite can be fully serviced on the trail and has exceptional cold-weather performance, making it one of the most reliable stoves in this index.

    Logan’s thoughts: The Whisperlite was the first camping stove I ever owned. It works and is reliable, period. But it’s also heavy, bulky, smelly, and loud. I kind of think of it as a necessary burden for trips to places where it’s hard to find cooking alcohol.

    • Weight: 417 grams (14.7 oz)
    • Price: $99.95
    • Place of Manufacture: Seattle, USA
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  REI  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $50
    Optimus Crux

    Optimus Crux

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane Mix
    • Output: 10,200 BTU
    • Pack Size: 3.3 × 2.2 × 1.3” (8 × 6 × 3cm)

    The Optimus Crux is an ultralight canister stove with a unique folding design that allows it to fit in the small cavity found in the bottom of a fuel canister. Although the stove itself is impressively small, the burner head is fairly wide, which helps distribute heat more evenly—which is quite important when cooking with lightweight titanium pots or mugs. Optimus also offers a non-folding Crux Lite that saves an additional 11g by eliminating the folding mechanism.

    From Miles’ review: The folding mechanism allows the already tiny stove to pack directly into the small cavity found in the bottom of a fuel canister, which I think is a clever use of unused space. The Crux maintains the smallest possible design by including folding pot supports and flame control lever, which lends itself to transforming into a peculiar little gizmo to hide away when not in use. One thing to note is that the larger burner head creates a wider flame, so pots or mugs with a diameter less than 4 inches will likely find the flame rising over the sides of the pot. This means wasted fuel and stray flames, I’d recommend sticking to pots with bases wider than 4 inches to avoid this entirely. I haven’t quite mastered the simmer control on the Crux yet, and often find myself sticking with cranking it wide open to boil water as quickly as possible. The control lever does offer some super fine tune adjustments though, almost too fine, to the point that it’s a little tricky to get it exactly where you want it when trying to simmer.

    • Optimus Crux Review
    • Optimus Crux Review
    • Optimus Crux Review
    • Optimus Crux Review
    • Optimus Crux Review
    • Weight: 83 grams (2.9 oz)
    • Price: $50
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $49.95
    Primus Micron Trail

    Primus Micron Trail

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane Mix
    • Output: 8,900 BTU
    • Pack Size: 2.4 × 2.2 × 2.7" (6 × 6 × 7cm)

    The Micron Trail stove is what Primus describes as one of their “most advanced stoves with a low weight and compact format.” It features a larger-than-average burner head, wide pot supports, and is available with or without a Piezo lighter ignition. Both Logan and Miles have used the Micron Trail stove without issue, but noticed the pack size isn’t as small as some of the others in this list.

    From Miles’ review: Although the pack size and weight is kept to a minimum, the stove is big where it counts. A larger-than-average burner head helps spread out the flame to reduce hot spots and burning when using small pots. The pot stands are wide and stable enough that boiling water in the morning right outside your tent isn’t asking for trouble, and the flame control lever is solid and easy to use. It’s noticeably sturdier than other canister stoves I’ve used and it feels like a really solid product. Although it folds down into a pretty small package, the legs do poke out a bit, resulting in some exposed sharp edges. You definitely don’t want to leave the little nylon storage bag behind or it’ll scratch up anything packed nearby.

    • Primus Micron Stove Review
    • Primus Micron Stove Review
    • Primus Micron Stove Review
    • Primus Micron Trail Stove
    • Primus Micron Stove Review
    • Weight: 94 grams (3.3 oz)
    • Price: $49.95 (Primus Micron Trail With Piezo)
    • Place of Manufacture: Europe
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $199.95
    Primus OmniLite TI

    Primus OmniLite TI

    • Type: Multi-Fuel Stove
    • Fuel Types: white gas, gasoline/petrol, diesel, kerosene/paraffin, LPG, aviation fuel
    • Output: 8,900 BTU
    • Pack Size: 4.5 × 3.5 × 2.2" (11 × 9 × 6cm)

    The Primus OmniLite Ti represents a new era of liquid fuel camp stoves, offering features that are appealing to month-long expeditions and overnighters alike. It packs up much smaller than the competition, and its unique titanium construction keeps the weight down to a minimum. Right out of the box it can burn white gas, gasoline / petrol, diesel, kerosene / paraffin, and even aviation fuel. Paired with the included 0.35L fuel bottle and the Primus ErgoPump, the OmniLite Ti is certainly one of the nicer liquid fuel camp stoves available.

    From Miles’ review: The OmniLite Ti Stove feels anything but clunky. Its titanium pot supports are stable and wide, and the feet provide a stable base for supporting large pots. Right out of the box it can burn gas, gasoline/petrol, diesel, kerosene/paraffin, and even aviation fuel. The entire stove is field-serviceable, and can also be used with compressed fuel canisters. I was particularly impressed with Primus’ ErgoPump, which is used to pressurize the fuel bottle when using liquid fuel. The handle feels durable and is comfortable to use, and the entire pump system is much smaller than other stoves I’ve used in the past.

    • Primus Omnilite Ti Stove
    • Primus Omnilite Ti Stove
    • Primus Omnilite Ti Stove
    • Primus Omnilite Ti Stove
    • Primus Omnilite Ti Stove
    • Weight: 341 grams (12 oz)
    • Price: $199.95
    • Place of Manufacture: Europe
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $49.95
    Snow Peak GigaPower Stove

    Snow Peak GigaPower Stove

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane Mix
    • Output: 10,000 BTU
    • Pack Size: 1.5 × 3" (4 × 8cm)

    The Snow Peak GigaPower Stove is designed to be equally durable as it is packable. Constructed from aluminum and stainless steel, it features four foldable arms, a solid 10,000 BTU output, and weighs just 90g. The GigaPower stove offers reasonable simmering ability, comes complete with a small plastic carrying case, and is available in an auto version with Piezo ignition or manual version that weighs 25g less.

    • Snow Peak Gigapower Stove, Stoves for Bike Touring
    • Snow Peak Gigapower Stove, Stoves for Bike Touring
    • Snow Peak Gigapower Stove, Stoves for Bike Touring
    • Snow Peak Gigapower Stove, Stoves for Bike Touring
    • Snow Peak Gigapower Stove, Stoves for Bike Touring

    Logan’s Thoughts: The Snow Peak Gigpower Stove is simple and seemingly bombproof. Unlike a lot of the other ultralight canister stoves, it’s pot stand arms aren’t made of thin, sheet-metal. Instead, it uses solid metal tubes, which seem very sturdy. That said, they make it a little heavier than others (it’s 30 grams heavier than Snow Peak’s svelte LiteMax stove) and they seem a little “slicker” than the serrated stand arms of the LiteMax and other stoves in it’s class. Still, I had no issues with it and the built-in igniter works flawlessly.

    • Weight: 86 grams (3 oz)
    • Price: $49.95 (GigaPower Stove 2.0 - Auto)
    • Place of Manufacture: Korea
    • Buy local, or at  REI  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $59.95
    Snow Peak LiteMax Titanium Stove

    Snow Peak LiteMax Titanium Stove

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane Mix
    • Output: 11,200 BTU
    • Pack Size: 2.6 × 3.14" (7 × 8cm)

    The Snow Peak LiteMax is a lightweight canister stove manufactured from Japanese titanium and anodized aluminum, with a total weight of just 56g. The LiteMax uses foldable arms and an integrated windscreen, and is Snow Peak’s lightest stove.

    From Logan’s review: The stove is made of titanium and aluminum and runs on isobutane/propane canisters, such as the GigaPower 110, also from Snow Peak. The LiteMax easily screws in to the GigaPower canister and lights with the turn of the 1.5-inch-long wire flame adjuster, which is easy to reach even under a large pot. Mounted to the canister, the stove is fairly stable with three folding titanium braces. The best thing about a canister stove is the speed. It takes all of a few seconds to set up, and at lower altitudes will boil 16 ounces (500ml) of water in less than 2 minutes (in zero wind). If you are in it for quickness and just need to boil for a dehydrated meal, or a cup of morning coffee, the LiteMax is perfect.

    • Snow Peak LiteMax Titanium Stove - Bikepacking
    • Snow Peak LiteMax Titanium Stove - Bikepacking
    • Snow Peak LiteMax Titanium Stove - Bikepacking
    • Snow Peak LiteMax Titanium Stove - Bikepacking
    • Snow Peak LiteMax Titanium Stove - Bikepacking
    • Weight: 56 grams (2 oz)
    • Price: $59.95
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $90
    Solo Stove Lite

    Solo Stove Lite

    • Type: Wood-Burning Stove
    • Fuel Types: Wood
    • Material: Stainless Steel
    • Pack Size: 4.25 × 5.7” (11 × 14cm)

    The Solo Stove Lite is a minimalist wood burning stove that is designed specifically for small twigs and sticks, while still burning hot enough to cook. Air intake holes at the base of the stove pull fresh air in, while the double-walled construction feeds hot air up along the sides for even more combustion. It’s made from stainless steel, weighs 255g, and can work alongside an alcohol stove as well.

    From Cass’ review: When conditions are optimal, the Solo Stove is extremely straightforward and almost on par with my Trangia/Clikstand, speedwise. I couldn’t help but chuckle with pleasure and excitement when using it. I didn’t measure boiling times, but they were certainly quick enough not to frustrate me, to the point that I missed not being able to simmer on occasions. I did find it an easy system to use after the initial learning curve, for both ‘real’ cooking and heating up dehydrated food. The pot’s wide enough to handle vegetables, though I had to be careful not to scald myself on its handles, which have a tendency to heat up quickly. Using a rag as a gripper did the job, also helping prevent anything from rattling around during transit too. In really windy conditions, it would benefit from a proper, fully enclosing windscreen; Solo Stove offers one made from aluminium, which folds flat.

    • Solo Stove Lite review bikepacking
    • Solo Stove Lite review bikepacking
    • Solo Stove Lite review bikepacking
    • Solo Stove Lite review bikepacking
    • Solo Stove Lite review bikepacking
    • Weight: 255 grams (9 oz)
    • Price: $90
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $15.99
    Trangia Spirit Burner Stove

    Trangia Spirit Burner Stove

    • Type: Spirit Burner Stove
    • Fuel Types: Denatured Alcohol
    • Material: Brass
    • Pack Size: 3 × 1.7" (8 × 4cm)

    The made-in-Sweden Trangia Stove is a classic among ultralight spirit burning stoves. Its brass construction and unique two-part wind shield design makes the Trangia stormproof and stable. Although the stove itself is quite small, best results require one of Trangia’s windscreen kits, and a pot or frying pan. The Trangia comes in two sizes: 25 (large) or 27 (small) and a number of different complete kits depending on your needs and preferences. The Trangia Burner will boil 1L of water in approximately 10 minutes, and has a built in simmer ring to reduce the amount of fuel available.

    • Clikstand Stove Review
    • Trangia Clikstand
    • Clikstand Stove, review, bikepacking stove
    • Clikstand Stove, review, bikepacking stove, trangia

    The Trangia spirit burners can’t be used used by itself, so you’ll need a lightweight support like Trangia’s own stand, or the Clikstand.

    From Cass’ review: Developed in Sweden, the humble Trangia burner has been around since the 1950s, proving itself in the demanding testing grounds of both military and school uses. Made from brass, it’s a simple, reliable, and extremely solid piece of gear. The ability to store fuel within the Trangia burner is a real advantage. It means you don’t need to 1) measure out exactly how much denatured alcohol you’ll need per meal and 2) futilely attempt to pour your leftovers back into your bottle. The Trangia’s simmer control works very well too, saving a considerable amount of fuel once a rolling boil is reached, while also allows the burner to be adjusted to a flame suitable for more subtle campside recipes. As with the whole system, there’s a short learning curve to learn its intricacies. Adjusting the simmer control while cooking is a little fiddly and there’s a certain art when using it to snuff out the flame.

    • Weight: 130 grams (4.6 oz)
    • Price: $15.99
    • Place of Manufacture: Sweden
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $39.95
    Vargo Hexagon Wood Stove

    Vargo Hexagon Wood Stove

    • Type: Wood-Burning Stove
    • Fuel Types: Wood
    • Material: Stainless Steel / Titanium
    • Pack Size: 5 × 5" (13 × 13cm)

    The Vargo Hexagon Wood Stove is an ultralight, collapsible wood burning stove that folds completely flat when disassembled. The hinged panels simply wrap around the base, and the door is still easily accessed to stoke the fire with a pot in place. Logan has often used the wood stove as a simple windscreen for his Trangia alcohol stove on multiple occasions, and has found it is built to last. The Hexagon Wood Stove is available in stainless steel or titanium, and weighs 210g or 116g, respectively. The titanium version is $59.95 and the stainless steel is $39.95 USD.

    • Vargo Hexagon Titanium Stove, Bikepacking
    • Vargo Hexagon Titanium Stove, Bikepacking
    • Vargo Hexagon Stove / Windscreen for Trangia Stove
    • Vargo Hexagon Stove - Burning Wood
    • Vargo Hexagon Stove Bikepacking

    From Logan’s review: We picked up the Vargo Hexagon stove as a last minute add-on before setting off to Africa. It doubled as a windscreen and pot stand for the Trangia, and still does on occasion. But its deeper purpose was to act as a safety net for times in the wilderness where we might not have access to fuel, times where it could be used as it is intended… as a wood burning stove. The stove accordion folds into a small flat pouch that is easily stowed in the frame bag. It’s simple to setup; the panels wrap around the base and latches via two male tabs. Using the Titanium Hexagon Stove with wood is fairly straightforward. I typically shave down tinder from small dry sticks with a knife, then gradually build it with smaller kindling. But you could also use something like a cedar fire starter and small twigs to build the base. When using a narrow pot such as the BOT, the hinged door can open freely and allow the fire to be stoked without disturbing the pot (click here for our review of the BOT). The conical shape of the stove creates a chimney effect to channel heat and boil water relatively quickly.

    • Weight: 210 grams (7.4 oz)
    • Price: $39.95 (Stainless Steel)
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $39
    Alpkit Bruler

    Alpkit Bruler

    • Type: Spirit Burner Stove
    • Fuel Types: Denatured alcohol, methyl alcohol, gel fuel tabs
    • Material: Copper, Aluminum
    • Pack Size: 3.5 × 3.1" (9 × 8cm)

    The Alpkit Bruler takes the simple design of an alcohol stove, but adds in the benefits of an integrated pot stand, retractable legs, and windscreen. When not in use, the entire system packs into the stand and easily stows away in a pack or frame bag. The Bruler weighs just 150g (5.3oz), works with methyl alcohol and gel fuels, and costs just $39 USD.

    • Alpkit Bruler Stove
    • Alpkit Bruler Stove
    • Alpkit Bruler Stove
    • Weight: 150 grams (5.3 oz)
    • Price: $39
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $58
    Alpkit Koro

    Alpkit Koro

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane
    • Output: 9,553 BTU
    • Pack Size: 3 × 2.7" (8 × 7cm)

    The Alpkit Koro is a canister fuel stove designed to excel in sub zero temperatures and high elevation situations. The Koro is made from titanium to save weight, and uses a remote canister hose to allow better wind shielding as well as the brass preheat tube to keep the stove operating efficiently in challenging conditions.

    • Alpkit Koro Stove
    • Alpkit Koro Stove
    • Alpkit Koro Stove
    • Weight: 124 grams (4.4 oz)
    • Price: $58
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $149.95
    Biolite Camp Stove 2

    Biolite Camp Stove 2

    • Type: Wood-Burning Stove
    • Fuel Types: Wood
    • Material: stainless steel, aluminum and plastic
    • Pack Size: 5 × 7.9" (13 × 20cm)

    The Biolite Camp Stove 2 is an electricity generating wood burning stove designed to simultaneously cook your meals and charge your gadgets at camp. Using small twins and organic material found on the ground the Camp Stove 2 uses the heat generated from fire to produce 3 watts of electricity that be used to charge devices in real time or stored for later in the on-board 2,600mAh battery. The size of the flame is controlled using four different fan speeds, and an LED display shows key information like heat generated, fan speed, and battery charge. Biolite claims the Camp Stove 2 can boil 1L of water in 4.5 minutes and packs down to the size of a 32oz widemouth Nalgene water bottle. Biolite offers a full range of cooking and lighting accessories that make the most out of the wood burning system, and although we don’t have any personal experience using it, it’s an interesting and popular option for both bikepackers and backpackers.

    • Weight: 938 grams (33.1 oz)
    • Price: $149.95
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $55
    Bushbox Titanium Pocket Stove

    Bushbox Titanium Pocket Stove

    • Type: Wood-Burning Stove
    • Fuel Types: Wood / Alcohol
    • Material: Titanium
    • Pack Size: 4.5 × 3.5" (11 × 9cm)

    The BushBox Titanium Pocket Stove is a multi-fuel, ultralight option that acts as a windscreen and pot support for those using a Trangia or Esbit alcohol-style stove or as a standalone wood burning stove. Its slotted design disassembles completely flat, and it includes an ash pan to protect the ground when burning organic matter. The Bushbox is made in Germany and weighs 160g.

    • Bushbox Titanium Pocket Stove
    • Bushbox Titanium Pocket Stove
    • Bushbox Titanium Pocket Stove
    • Weight: 160 grams (5.6 oz)
    • Price: $55
    • Place of Manufacture: Germany
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $100
    Bushbuddy

    Bushbuddy

    • Type: Wood-Burning Stove
    • Fuel Types: Wood
    • Material: Stainless Steel
    • Dimensions: 4.25 × 3.75” (11 × 9.5cm) Nested

    The Bushbuddy is a double-walled, wood-burning stove that has second wall that surrounds the main burning chamber. This allows for secondary combustion air to provide radiant heat and burn hotter and cleaner. The double-wall design also works as a “damper” to limit the amount of oxygen fed to the fire for a more efficient burn. Bushbuddy claims it has a boil time of 8–10 minutes for one quart of water.

    The Bushbuddy Stove is made in Alaska from stainless steel and will fit inside the TOAKS 115mm pots, Snow Peak 900, Evernew ECA522 Pasta Pot M, Evernew ECA267, Evernew ECA402, Evernew ECA265, MSR Titan Kettle (lid will not close), and other similar sized pots.

    • Weight: 181 grams (6.4 oz)
    • Price: $100
    • Place of Manufacture: Alaska, USA
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $59.95
    Caldera Keg Stove System

    Caldera Keg Stove System

    • Type: Spirit Burner Stove
    • Fuel Types: Denatured Alcohol
    • Material: Aluminum
    • Pack Size: TBD

    The Caldera Keg Stove System claims to be “the lightest, most stable, wind resistant, and efficient cooking system you can buy.” It’s an alcohol stove that uses a reinforced beer can pot, a 16g stove, and a unique cone system to capture and direct heat where it’s needed. The entire system is made in the USA, and includes a fuel bottle with measuring cup, insulating cozy, a protective case, and the Caldera Cone windscreen / pot support—all for just $59.95 USD.

    • Weight: 181 grams (6.4 oz)
    • Price: $59.95 (Caldera Keg-F Stove System)
    • Place of Manufacture: USA
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $12.95
    Esbit Pocket Stove

    Esbit Pocket Stove

    • Type: Solid Fuel Stove
    • Fuel Types: Solid Fuel
    • Material: Galvanized, Hardened Steel
    • Pack Size: 3.9 × 3 × 0.9” (10 × 8 × 2cm)

    The Esbit Foldable Pocket Stove is a minimalist solid fuel stove, designed specifically for Esbit’s Solid Fuel Tablets. The tablets are highly combustible fire starter cubes commonly used with twigs or kindling to start a larger campfire, but can also be used as a standalone fuel in conjunction with the pocket stove. They are nearly smokeless and residue-free, and work well at high altitude and sub-zero temperatures. Each tablet burns for about 12 minutes each, and will boil 500ml of water in about 8 minutes—the Esbit Foldable Pocket Stove is definitely more suited for making coffee, tea, and small dehydrated meals. Esbit also makes several other different models, including a larger pocket stove, an ultralight titanium stove, and an aluminum cookset—all based around the same solid fuel tablets.

    • Esbit Pocket Stove
    • Esbit Pocket Stove
    • Esbit Pocket Stove
    • Weight: 92 grams (3.2 oz)
    • Price: $12.95
    • Place of Manufacture: Germany
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    ^ Close
  • $59.95
    Jetboil MightyMo

    Jetboil MightyMo

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane Mix
    • Output: 10,000 BTU
    • Pack Size: 2 × 3" (5 × 8cm)

    The Jetboil MightyMo is a packable, foldable canister stove, weighing in at less than a deck of cards. It features a boil time of roughly three minutes due to its high 10,000 BTU output, while its four-turn regulator offers incremental heat adjustments from light simmer to full boil. The MightyMo is also compatible with Jetboil’s line of Flux Ring pots and skillets, for preparing larger dishes, and has a push-button igniter for lighting the stove.

    • Jetboil MightyMo Stove
    • Jetboil MightyMo Stove
    • Jetboil MightyMo Stove
    • Jetboil MightyMo Stove
    • Jetboil MightyMo Stove
    • Weight: 95 grams (3.4 oz)
    • Price: $59.95
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $4
    Lixada Mini Alcohol Stove

    Lixada Mini Alcohol Stove

    • Type: Spirit Burner Stove
    • Fuel Types: Denatured Alcohol
    • Material: Aluminum
    • Pack Size: 2.8 × 1.7" (7 × 4CM)

    There’s not a lot of information on the Lixada Mini Alcohol Stove, but it’s a Chinese-made alcohol stove with an aluminum construction and delightfully affordable price tag. It uses a similar design to the Trangia Spirit Burner, and Lixada appears to offer additional accessories including a pot stand and windscreen to create a complete system—all of which can be found on Amazon and Aliexpress.

    • Weight: 26 grams (0.9 oz)
    • Price: $4
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $139.95
    MSR Dragonfly

    MSR Dragonfly

    • Type: Multi-Fuel Stove
    • Fuel Types: White Gas, kerosene, unleaded auto fuel, diesel, and jet fuel
    • Output: 8,700 BTU
    • Pack Size: 6.3 × 5 × 3.5” (16 × 12.7 × 9cm)

    The MSR Dragonfly uses a similar design to their other multi-fuel stoves, but offers better flame control and a larger, more stable pot support. For those looking to prepare complicated meals for large groups, the Dragonfly should be at the top of your list. As a bonus, it is still compatible with several different liquid fuels, including white gas, kerosene, unleaded auto fuel, diesel, and jet fuel.

    • Weight: 396 grams (14 oz)
    • Price: $139.95
    • Place of Manufacture: Seattle, USA
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  REI  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $149.95
    MSR Windburner Stove

    MSR Windburner Stove

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane Mix
    • Output: 7,000 BTU
    • Pack Size: 8.3 × 4.5" (21 × 11cm)

    The MSR Windburner is an all-in-one canister stove that relies on a radiant burner head in an enclosed, windproof design for better efficiency in undesirable weather. Like the Primus ETA Lite+ and Jetboil series, the entire system nests inside the pot for easy packing, and includes a small bowl, support legs, and a BPA-free strainer / drinking lid. The Windburner system comes in two sizes; a personal version with a 1L pot and duo version with a 1.8L pot. The Windburner Stove system also happens to made in the USA!

    • Weight: 430 grams (15.2 oz)
    • Price: $149.95 (Windburner Personal Stove)
    • Place of Manufacture: USA
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $89.95
    Primus Firestick

    Primus Firestick

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane Mix
    • Output: 8,530 BTU
    • Pack Size: 1.4 × 4.1” (4 × 10cm)

    The Primus Firestick is a uniquely designed canister stove designed to be easily packable and accessible. Available in both stainless steel and titanium, the Firestick has three integrated pot supports that are held in place with a screw-on cap when stowed away. A separate one-handed piezo ignitor is included with the stove, as well as a wool pouch that doubles as a pot holder. The stainless steel model weighs 104g for $89.95, while the titanium option weighs 87g for $119.95.

    • Primus Firestick
    • Primus Firestick
    • Primus Firestick
    • Primus Firestick
    • Primus Firestick
    • Weight: 104 grams (3.7 oz)
    • Price: $89.95 (Stainless Steel)
    • Place of Manufacture: Europe
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $114.95
    Primus Lite+ Stove System

    Primus Lite+ Stove System

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane Mix
    • Output: 4,500 BTU
    • Pack Size: 3.9 × 5.1” (10 × 13cm)

    The Primus Lite+ Stove System is a compact, complete all-in-one stove that includes a burner and 0.5L pot that lock securely together while in use. The kit includes small metal pegs that allow the burner to be used with non-Primus pot or pan, an insulated pot sleeve, and a small pot lid that doubles as a cup. The system comes with a canister support for more stability as well as a hanging kit for when you can’t find a place on the ground to cook. When paired with a 100g fuel canister, the burner (and canister) can pack inside the pot for travel.

    • Primus ETA Lite
    • Primus ETA Lite

    Miles’ Thoughts: The Primus Lite+ was my first compact stove I purchased specially for bikepacking and it has always been a personal favourite of mine. I loved how the burner could remain attached the fuel canister, while still nesting neatly inside the pot and the insulated sleeve and large hand strap made it easy to handle while cooking. It’s small, at 0.5L, but perfect for solo trips. I never had much luck simmering with the Primus Lite+, and felt it was best suited for boiling water or very simple meal preparation.

    • Weight: 348 grams (12.3 oz)
    • Price: $114.95
    • Place of Manufacture: Europe
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $169.95
    Primus Omnifuel

    Primus Omnifuel

    • Type: Multi-Fuel Stove
    • Fuel Types: fuel canisters, white gas, kerosene, diesel, and aviation fuel
    • Output: 10,500 BTU
    • Pack Size: 5.6 × 3.5 × 2.6" (14 × 9 × 7cm)

    The Primus Omnifuel, as the name suggests, is a multi-fuel stove that can use fuel canisters, white gas, kerosene, diesel, and even aviation fuel to operate. It has a high 10,500 BTU output and a wide flame that is best suited for cooking on larger pots for groups of people. The Omnifuel also offers better flame control due to its fine control valve, and includes different jet nipples depending on what fuel you’re using. It weighs 450g (15.9oz) and ships with the same fuel bottle and ErgoPump as the OmniLite Ti.

    • Weight: 450 grams (15.9 oz)
    • Price: $169.95
    • Place of Manufacture: Europe
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $64.95
    Soto WindMaster

    Soto WindMaster

    • Type: Canister Stove
    • Fuel Types: Butane / Propane Mix
    • Output: 11,000 BTU
    • Pack Size: 3.7 × 0.4 × 1.0" (9 × 1 × 3cm)

    The Soto WindMaster is an extremely popular option for ultralight backpackers and bikepackers looking for a blend of efficiency, compactness, and ease of use. It also made the top of The Pacific Crest Trail’s 2019 Gear Guide survey results, as one of the most popular stoves. The stove’s efficiency can be thanked to the proximity of the burner head to the pot, allowing 2 cups of water to boil in under 2.5 minutes in strong winds and gusty weather.

    • Weight: 87 grams (3.1 oz)
    • Price: $64.95 (WindMaster Stove with 4Flex)
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $34.95
    Toaks Titanium Siphon Alcohol Stove

    Toaks Titanium Siphon Alcohol Stove

    • Type: Spirit Burner Stove
    • Fuel Types: Denatured Alcohol
    • Material: Titanium
    • Pack Size: 2.13 × 1.5" (5 × 4cm)

    Popular amongst ultralight backpackers, the Toaks Titanium Siphon Alcohol Stove uses a double-walled construction to create a siphoning effect the is claimed to be quite efficient. The stove is made of titanium, weighs just 19.8 grams (0.7oz), and can boil 2 cups water in 5 min. 30 sec.

    • Weight: 20 grams (0.7 oz)
    • Price: $34.95
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Buy local, or at  REI  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $64.95
    Toaks Titanium Wood Stove

    Toaks Titanium Wood Stove

    • Type: Wood-burning Stove
    • Fuel Types: Wood
    • Material: Titanium
    • Pack Size: 4.15 × 4.15" (11 × 11cm)

    The Toaks Titanium Wood Stove is a three part wood burning stove that relies on a similar design as the Solo Stove Lite to bring cool air in the bottom and move hot air up along the sides of the stove. The parts all nest within each other to make packing easier, and can fit within Toaks 1,100ml Titanium Pot as well. The stove weighs 225g and comes with a nylon stuff sack.

    • Weight: 225 grams (7.9 oz)
    • Price: $64.95
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close
  • $34.95
    Vargo Triad

    Vargo Triad

    • Type: Alcohol / Solid Fuel Stove
    • Fuel Types: Alcohol, Fuel Tabs, Gel Fuel
    • Made of: Titanium
    • Pack Size: 3.5 × 1” (9 × 3cm)

    The Vargo Triad is another popular alcohol stove, and due to its minimal titanium construction, it’s also one of the lightest stoves currently available. At 30g, the Triad goes nearly unnoticeable in any bag, and can function as a standard alcohol stove or when flipped over can burn solid fuel or gel fuel as well. Unlike other alcohol stoves and DIY options, it has built in foldable pot supports and legs, which helps with airflow and the overall performance of the stove.

    • Weight: 30 grams (1.1 oz)
    • Price: $34.95
    • Place of Manufacture: China
    • Buy local, or at  Amazon  helpWe highly encourage you to buy from a local shop when possible, but if you're going to buy online, you can use our affiliate links. We'll get a very small kickback that will help support this site.
    • Manufacturer's Details: Link
    ^ Close

Bikepacking Stove Kits

by Logan Watts

Once you’ve figured out what type of stove to use for a particular trip or preferrred bikepacking locale, it’s time to start planning the cook kit. To illustrate, here are four of my favorites that I often bring on solo outings as well as longer trips abroad. Each is centered around a different stove type and all nests inside the pot.

Bikepacking Stove Cook Kit bike touring

Solo Kit
MSR Pocket Rocket + Vargo BOT 700

This is my go-to cook kit for solo outings. At the helm of this kit is the MSR Pocket Rocket 2, one of my favorite stoves in this genre. That said, there are several other great options that work just as well, such as Snow Peak’s LiteMax and Gigapower. The Vargo BOT 700 doubles as a coffee mug and a small pot, and it holds a small, 110 gram isobutane canister with the Pocket Rocket and lighter. This kit its ideal for boiling water, heating up one-person meals, and making coffee. I almost always pack in a GSI Pot Scraper, and you could easily include a metal windscreen in the perimeter of the pot, if need be. I usually wrap the stove in a small piece of cloth, and have another shard of old T-shirt to put around the fuel canister to keep it from banging around.

Bikepacking Stove Cook Kit bike touring

Ultralight Solo Kit
Can Stove or Vargo Triad + MSR Titan Kettle

On a few occasions where I was looking to keep my rig at a very svelte weight, I’ve packed this incredibly lightweight kit. First, a simple DIY can stove is about as light as they come. Another option for such a kit would be the Vargo Triad or Evernew Titanium stove. The MSR Titan Kettle is also pretty minimal and doubles as a pot and a mug. Depending on the duration of the trip, I’d carry either a small REI flask for fuel storage, or a small repurposed bottle, or 4oz Nalgene.

Bikepacking Stove Cook Kit bike touring

International 2p
Trangia + Vargo Hexagon + 1L Pot

Virginia and I have used this kit extensively through Africa, Europe, and elsewhere. Essentially, it includes two stoves. First, the Trangia Spirit Burner serves as the primary stove. Second, the Vargo Hexagon Wood Burning Stove doubles as a pot stand and windscreen, and it serves as a standby in case we run out of fuel—in that case, we can just find some dry twigs and sticks and cook with fire. This stove combo works remarkably well and the flip-open door on the stove allows you to tweak the simmer lid on the Trangia. Note that setting the Trangia on its cap can also increase the heat as it makes it closer to the pot.

International 2p (Cold Weather)
Whisperlite International + 1L Pot

When traveling somewhere where cooking alcohol is unavailable—for example, Central Asia—the Whisperlite International has been our go-to stove. While we prefer cooking with spirits, we resorted to using unleaded gasoline in places like Kyrgyzstan where there was no alcohol to be found. In addition, alcohol doesn’t burn well in colder temperatures. And, if you’re looking for a kit for melting snow for water in the winter, a gas cooker might be the best bet.

Carrying Fuel

Depending on the length of your trip, resupply options, and fuel availability, the type of fuel and means by which you carry it will vary significantly. As mentioned, most of us much prefer cooking with methylated spirits as it’s quieter, cleaner, and generally easier. However, if you prefer a gas stove or need to go that route because of temperature or availability, the most obvious and readily available choice are MSR Liquid Fuel Bottles. They come in three sizes—11, 20, and 30oz (0.33L, 0.59L, 0.89L)—and are very reliable with a cap designed to work with gasoline, kerosene, white gas, and other fuel. The smaller 11oz can has a diameter of 2.5″ and can generally be stashed in a frame bag or the adjustable Topeak Versa Cage, whereas the larger two are better to store in a non-traditional bottle cage. The 20oz bottle has a 2.75″ diameter, which is similar to that of a standard water bottle, so something like a King Cage Iris cage should work (although we haven’t tried this combo). Larger bottles will require something like a ratcheting Arundel Cage, or an Anything style cage with Voile Straps. Primus has its own bottles in four sizes—0.35L (2.6”) / 0.6L (2.9”) / 1.0L (3.1”) / 1.5L (3.5”). Note that while some people have reported successfully carrying gasoline and white gas in a Klean Kanteen, the plastic cap isn’t designed for it and we’ve read some reports that it swells from the fuel.

  • Bikepacking Hacks - Fuel
  • Topeak Modula II Bottle Cage for Bike Touring

You can also use similar bottles to carry cooking alcohol (see below), although it’s also safe to carry methyl spirits in plastic containers, so there are many other options. Our favorite method is the polyethylene flasks from REI, which now seem hard to find (the closest being this). They are leak-proof, reliable, and easy to stash inside the frame bag to keep the weight low and centered. For short, overnighter trips, you can repurpose a travel shampoo bottle, 5-hour energy drink bottle, or another small water-tight container. And in a pinch, any soda bottle will do.

All about Cooking Alcohol

Spirit burners, such as the popular Trangia, or DIY can stoves, can only use alcohol-based fuels. This type of fuel is often composed of methanol or ethanol and contains at least 70% alcohol. Ethanol (aka denatured alcohol or ethyl alcohol) provides the most energy, but it also puts off more soot than methanol. Conversely, methanol burns clean but puts off toxic fumes. The three most popular and readily available options in the US are:

– Crown Alcohol Stove Fuel (65-75% methanol/20-30% ethanol)
– Green Strip Denatured Alcohol (80-90% ethanol/5% methanol)
– HEET (yellow) (100% methanol)

You can see these pitted against one another here. Isopropyl alcohol is another option that burns well, but produces a lot of dirty soot and is far from ideal. There are also bio-ethanol fuels available, such as EkoFuel, although we don’t have any experience with these. If you’ve used this, or another bio-ethanol fuel, please let us know about your experiences in the comments section.

  • bike touring morocco - the sahara
  • denatured alcohol bikepacking

When traveling abroad, the most common challenge is figuring out the name of cooking alcohol in a particular country, and where it’s sold. The most common places to find it are hardware stores, supermarkets, paint shops, or pharmacies. Trangia has a few of the country-specific terms listed here, and we’ve also encountered others, like alcool à bruler in Morocco. In East Africa, it’s available in many stores, even in small villages, and usually comes in plastic bottles that resemble a small bottle of water, only it’s tinted purple.

We considered a lot of bikepacking-friendly stoves for this index, but we’re sure there are some good options that we missed. If you have one that you think is worthy of sharing, please leave it in the comments below. Note that we tried to avoid copies. Likewise, if you have any suggestions regarding fuel choices or information regarding cooking alcohol, please let us know below…